Medical Hero Spotlight: Phyllis Kaplan & Type 1 Diabetes

Phyllis has a vague recollection of waking up in a hospital with tubes attached to her body, and a distinct memory of saying “Take the tubes out!”. At the age of two, she was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes, an autoimmune disease, typically diagnosed in childhood, but can manifest at any age. Diabetes has led Phyllis on a path from patient to advocate, to clinical research participant.

“I have been an advocate since I was 12 years old. It started in junior high school, in a gym class when the teacher made me take off my medical alert bracelet, due to a ‘no jewelry in gym class’ rule,” says Phyllis. When she went to retrieve the medical bracelet from the gym locker after class, she discovered it had been stolen. This incident spurred Phyllis to write a letter to the town Superintendent of Schools, demanding its replacement and a change in the rule to allow medical-related items to be worn. By the time the letter had been delivered, the bracelet had been anonymously returned to the school’s Lost & Found box. Phyllis was allowed to wear the bracelet moving forward.

The most important thing to understand about type 1 diabetes, says Phyllis, is “The patient or caregiver has to make so many decisions about the disease, every day with no break. With diabetes, every day is different.”

Type 1 diabetes develops quickly. The body’s immune system attacks and destroys beta cells in the pancreas that create insulin. The body cannot produce insulin without these beta cells. A peptide hormone, insulin helps your body metabolize fats, proteins and carbohydrates through glucose (a type of sugar) that is released into the bloodstream when you eat food. The glucose is then absorbed from the blood in the liver, fat and skeletal muscle cells. Type 2 diabetes develops more slowly, over time. The body produces insulin, but cannot use it effectively. (1)

Decisions about how much medication to take is based on many variables including food, exercise, change in weather, change in personal schedule and stress.

“That’s why education is so important,” says Phyllis. “If I am going to exercise, I have to plan ahead, at least a couple of hours before, as exercise impacts blood sugar. There are so many hidden things to know about diabetes that impact your decisions.”

Phyllis has participated in three clinical trials, two for rescue medications for severe hypoglycemia and one for a medical device. “As a longtime advocate, I felt that participating in a clinical trial was the ultimate form of advocacy,” Phyllis explains.

“The trials were very different from each other,” says Phyllis. “Two of the three were very easy. One involved two full days in clinic, and that was really hard, with 9 hours of ongoing blood tests. Those were physically difficult days, but worth it. The other two clinical trials were less invasive.”

When considering the 2-day in-clinic trial, Phyllis and her husband reviewed the protocol together. “I wouldn’t participate without consulting him,” says Phyllis. He accompanied her to the two in-clinic days, to be with her during the 9 hours of ongoing tests and to lend additional support.

When asked if she faced any concerns from family or friends about her clinical research participation, Phyllis says “No, quite the opposite. People were really interested in the ‘why’ of what I was doing and what the outcomes were.” Phyllis didn’t seek any advice from patient advocacy organizations, because of her own experience as an advocate. She is a brand ambassador with Medtronic Diabetes to share her experience with their medical device and  also volunteers with JDRF (Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation), and ADA (American Diabetes Association)

Phyllis advises individuals considering clinical research participation to “Ask all the questions you have when meeting with the nurse/study lead. No question is too silly. Read the protocol and informed consent, which can be confusing. Use a highlighter to mark items in the protocol or use Post-Its to make notes. Keep asking questions throughout the course of the study. At times the research staff may not always be patient-centric, and if you’re not getting the answers to your questions, ask to speak with someone else on the study team. Be your own best advocate and keep pushing. Researchers are not always prepared to answer patients’ questions. If something doesn’t sit well with you, voice it.”

Phyllis’ advocacy work has also led her to CISCRP, where she is Senior Manager, Events & Community Engagement. CISCRP’s mission to informing and engaging patients and the public about the importance of clinical research resonated with her. Phyllis leads CISCRP’s Aware for All free clinical research educational programs, which have pivoted from in-person, city-specific events to regional, virtual programs with the advent of the pandemic. You can learn more about AWARE for All here.

Her experience as a clinical trial participant has strengthened Phyllis’ commitment in sharing information about the importance of clinical trials to everyone. Phyllis is adamant and passionate about participating in clinical research again if the opportunity presents itself, reiterating, “Absolutely. Without clinical trials new treatments can’t happen and without clinical trial participants, clinical trials can’t happen.”

To search for medical conditions in a specific location visit our Search Clinical Trials page.

To stay informed about clinical trials, visit our Resources page.

Sources

Medical Hero Story: Melvin Mann & Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia (CML)

Melvin Mann with his wife, Cecelia, and their daughter, Dr. Patrice Mann

“CML (chronic myelogenous leukemia) is supposed to be a disease that strikes people in their sixties, and I was in my thirties,” recalls Melvin Mann. A family man and Army major, Melvin was stunned to learn he had CML at the age of 37.

His symptoms had started out as back pain and fatigue, which he had been treating with medication and physical therapy, to no avail. In a visit with his physician at a local military clinic, an MRI was ordered requiring Melvin to drive several hours to another military base that had the MRI equipment. It would be a month before Melvin learned the results of the full-body scan.

It was January of 1995. Melvin received the diagnosis of CML, which was confirmed by a second opinion he sought. Melvin was advised by his doctor that without a successful bone marrow transplant, his life expectancy was about three years. The best bone marrow matches are with a patient’s relatives, but if they are not a match, a donor must be of the same ethnicity. No relatives matched, nor did any registered donors. At that time, there were a limited number of African Americans on the bone marrow donor registry. Melvin began the treatment prescribed by his physician which were daily injections of interferon.

Melvin thought about his wife, Cecelia, and his daughter, Patrice, who was just five years old, and decided to take action in the search for a donor. Working with marrow donor organizations, and the Department of Defense (DOD) Marrow Foundation, marrow drives were launched within the military. Melvin participated in these outreach efforts, which scaled to include college campuses, malls and churches, radio and television interviews, as well as military bases. His experience as an Army recruiter and public relations officer and degree in public relations propelled him to forge ahead, even when he didn’t find a match. Melvin medically retired from the Army in 1995 and continued his outreach efforts with bone marrow drives, as his health would allow.

At a marrow drive organized by his aunt in April of 1996, Melvin had a life-changing meeting with a local businessman who had seen Melvin’s TV promotions for the event. This individual had been gravely ill with hairy cell leukemia and had been treated at MD Anderson Cancer Center in Houston, Texas, with excellent results. He urged Melvin to contact them.

Thus began Melvin’s experience with clinical trial participation. It had been 16 months since his diagnosis of CML, and none of the medical professionals involved in his care had broached the topic of clinical trials. The bone marrow drives he was involved with were finding donors for many patients, but not for him. Melvin decided that participating in a clinical trial was his next step towards fighting the illness.

Over the next two years, Melvin traveled between his home in Atlanta and Houston, trying different combinations of vetted and clinical trial medications through MD Anderson. (At the outset of the Imatinib clinical trial, he had to stay in Houston for three months). Over time, the interferon and other clinical trial medications stopped working. A lifelong competitive runner, his body weakened and he suffered intense fatigue. He was, however, eight months past his original prognosis of surviving three years, when he had the opportunity to participate in an Imatinib clinical trial. The Phase I trial tested for the drug’s safety in humans, dosage level and evidence of efficacy.

The Imatinib clinical trial had three locations: MD Anderson, Oregon Healthy & Science University in Portland and UCLA Medical Center in California. Melvin’s medical care continued to be seated in Houston.

“It was for quality of life – not a cure. I was hoping for a better outcome,” Melvin explained. He also thought about how his participation would help other cancer patients.

The process was rigorous. In the first week, Melvin had blood drawn up to 10 times per day. He was required to keep a detailed record of side effects, the time he took the medication, his energy level, diet and other daily details. He experienced severe nausea and was prescribed medication to alleviate it. Melvin’s effort, perseverance and grit paid off. The drug was a game-changer for him. In June of 1999, nine months after starting the clinical trial, Melvin participated in fundraising events for the Leukemia & Lymphoma Society by running a marathon in Alaska and a few months after that, cycling 111 miles in Tucson, Arizona.

Melvin has been taking Imatinib ever since. The medication was approved for use in CML in May 2001 by the United States FDA (Food and Drug Administration). Melvin participated in another clinical trial to see if he could come off the medication, but he could not. Over the past 26 years, Melvin has participated in three clinical trials for different combinations of medications.

“Trials have changed over the years,” said Melvin. “The last (Imatinib) trial I was in was in 2017. I had to travel every three months to the trial site, although some testing was done at home. The COVID-19 pandemic has increased that whatever you can do at home or with a local doctor, in terms of aspirations and blood draws.”

For some patients, particularly members of the Black and African American communities, the specter of the unethical Tuskegee Syphilis Study still influences opinions about the safety of clinical research, despite vast advances in oversight and regulation made in subsequent years by the United States government to ensure the safe and ethical treatment of all patients. It is important that patients are asked if they would like to participate in a clinical trial.

Melvin advises patients and the public that “It’s vital to know that clinical trials are an option. There can be benefits from a clinical trial. You are getting more attention because the studies often require you to be watched more and seen by staff more frequently. In oncology clinical trials, you’re not getting a placebo, you’re at least getting the standard of care treatment. It’s important to weigh your options. Can you get the support you need from family or a caregiver? Ask questions of the study staff. There are risks involved, so ask about them. You have the choice to stop being in a clinical trial, whenever you decide.”

Mel is now the world’s longest living Imatinib and tyrosine kinase inhibitor CML survivor. Mel had a MBA, but in 2000 he decided to change his career focus. He returned to higher education and earned an BA in English Literature, M. Ed. In Secondary English and a teaching license, all within the span of three and a half years. He and Cecelia continue to volunteer for various cancer and bone marrow donation organizations. Mel continues to participate in marathon and half-marathon events, and sometimes 10Ks with his wife and daughter, Dr. Patrice Mann, a psychiatry specialist, graduate of Harvard College and Emory Medical School.

“I recommend clinical trials, at least to ask about them. It’s also important for doctors to ask patients if they want to participate in clinical research,” said Mel.

To search for medical conditions in a specific location visit our Search Clinical Trials page.

To stay informed about clinical trials, visit our Resources page.

Medical Hero Story: Tina Aswani Omprakash and Crohn’s Disease

Her tone serious and earnest, Tina says “I had an epiphany. I can do a lot of good by participating in clinical research, and good could come out of this terrible experience.”

As a recent college graduate in 2005, Tina felt like the world was just opening up. She was excited about starting her career on Wall Street as a compliance professional in investment banking. This beginning was an entirely different universe from the one she inhabits now, as a globally recognized health and disability advocate for Crohn’s disease, a form of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Tina’s own diagnosis with Crohn’s was far from straightforward, testing her physical and emotional stamina. “I realized my case was very severe, and a bit of an anomaly and I should be in clinical research,” Tina says.

Initially, Tina was mis-diagnosed in her early twenties with ulcerative colitis, another form of IBD. Her father’s life had been claimed at the age of 39, from Crohn’s that had morphed into colorectal cancer, so Tina was particularly aware about being proactive when it came to health issues. Tina describes her initial symptoms as “…kind of an on again, off again. Some flare-ups were bad, and some were not so bad.”

Tina worked to make accommodations for her symptoms and kept living life as usual. After a vacation in Mexico, she became very ill with food poisoning. Physician-prescribed antibiotics made Tina develop c. difficile, an infection caused by the overuse of antibiotics. Tina’s weight plunged from 135 pounds to 85 pounds over a six-month period in 2008.

Her experience with the disease was compounded by socio-cultural influences. Being of South Asian descent, Tina says “I felt like a failure,” because many community members view gastrointestinal disorders as a disease fueled by poor personal diet choices. “My culture and many families are oftentimes against medications to treat IBD,” Tina explains. “By the time I tried biologics (whatever was available at that time to treat the Crohn’s), it was too late.”

In 2008, Tina underwent life-saving surgery to remove her colon, but her health issues were far from over. But that was a challenge in and of itself. Her family and elders within the community were against ostomy surgery. Tina  felt looked at as an outcast but went ahead with the ostomy surgery.

Six months post-surgery, Tina was navigating life with a stoma (a surgically created opening in the abdomen that connects to the digestive system to allow urine of feces to be diverted out of the body) and was slowly recovering. Due to the stigma around ostomies in her culture, at 25, Tina underwent a procedure to create a j-shaped pouch from her small intestine, that would enable her to defecate similar to how she did pre-surgery, and the stoma was reversed. She quickly developed pouchitis, inflammation of the j-pouch, which escalated into symptoms of bloody diarrhea. Tina combatted the symptoms for a few years with antibiotics, but the pouch began to burrow holes into other organs (abscesses developed and fistulae broke through). At this time, her diagnosis was changed from ulcerative colitis to Crohn’s disease.

It turned out that Tina had developed multiple fistulae that further impacted her quality of life.  After living with the j-pouch for 6 years, it had to be removed. Tina, this time, received a permanent ostomy. The wound from the j-pouch was not healing correctly, and a second medical opinion and MRI confirmed that pieces of the j-pouch and rectum were still inside Tina’s body, causing a pelvic fistula that could potentially impact her spine, causing paralysis.

“It was a really hellish period,” Tina recalls. “I had seven surgeries over eight months to correct the botched surgery that resulted in a chronic rectal wound and caused the large abscess and fistula. At the end of this whole process, another fistula had developed and I had had it. I decided to go into a clinical trial for (another) biologic.”

The results were encouraging.

“It took a good six months, but the fistula closed, and I was declared to be in remission,” said Tina.

Tina has had multiple complications from the many surgeries she has endured. “It’s complicated – it’s not cut and dry,” says Tina. “I have multiple diagnoses of other diseases that I continue to manage, but Crohn’s has really been the beast in my journey.”

There were several factors that motivated Tina to investigate clinical research as a health care option.

“I was like ‘Just get me on something!’ I am sick and tired of this disease and the surgeries and I needed to do something to make it stop,” says Tina. The physicians and staff of the clinical trial explained the details thoroughly. “I did a lot of thinking and research, and I decided I couldn’t keep living my life in and out of the hospital. Initially, my family was hesitant but they too were sick of seeing me suffer. My husband was on board with my decision.”

Tina’s experience underscored the importance of an accurate initial diagnosis and proactive disease monitoring and treatment. Between that and her experiences with cultural stigma and shame, Tina decided to shift her focus to patient advocacy.

“I learned a lot on my own through the research I did. I had become pretty savvy at reading technical science journal articles. I learned a lot from the doctors I met when we were discussing how to treat my disease,” said Tina.

Tina’s journey as a patient with Crohn’s disease has impacted her personal and professional life in profound ways.

“This has become a coming-of-age story – I realized I didn’t have to be ashamed of having this disease. I wasn’t disrespecting my elders because I was treating this disease. This is my body and this is my life and I have to pay that respect to myself as well. I don’t want anyone else to suffer, and that’s why I talk about clinical research and educate others on its importance.”

Tina started her advocacy work by launching a website, OwnYourCrohn’s.com, in 2018. Tina is now a well-known and respected voice in the Crohn’s community, regularly speaking at medical conferences and acclaimed academic research hospitals, as well as being widely quoted in the media. Tina is currently pursuing her Masters in Public Health at Mount Sinai. Tina also recently co-founded a community called IBDesis in conjunction with 5 fellow South Asians  who don’t want stigma and fear of medications to overshadow diagnosis and treatment of IBD.

When asked if she recommends clinical research participation to others, Tina says “Hands down, no question about it. I particularly want people of color, who may be skeptical of clinical trials, to know that every iteration is robustly managed in a clinical trial. You know you’re going to get the best care possible. It was honestly a no-brainer for me and I’d do it again in a heartbeat.”

To search for medical conditions in a specific location visit our Search Clinical Trials page.

To stay informed about clinical trials, visit our Resources page.

Sources

  1. https://www.bladderandbowel.org/bowel/stoma/what-is-a-stoma/

      2. https://ownyourcrohns.com/honoredhero/

Medical Hero Spotlight: Tina Aswani Omprakash and Crohn’s Disease

Her tone serious and earnest, Tina says “I had an epiphany. I can do a lot of good by participating in clinical research, and good could come out of this terrible experience.”

As a recent college graduate in 2005, Tina felt like the world was just opening up. She was excited about starting her career on Wall Street as a compliance professional in investment banking. This beginning was an entirely different universe from the one she inhabits now, as a globally recognized health and disability advocate for Crohn’s disease, a form of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Tina’s own diagnosis with Crohn’s was far from straightforward, testing her physical and emotional stamina. “I realized my case was very severe, and a bit of an anomaly and I should be in clinical research,” Tina says.

Initially, Tina was mis-diagnosed in her early twenties with ulcerative colitis, another form of IBD. Her father’s life had been claimed at the age of 39, from Crohn’s that had morphed into colorectal cancer, so Tina was particularly aware about being proactive when it came to health issues. Tina describes her initial symptoms as “…kind of an on again, off again. Some flare-ups were bad, and some were not so bad.”

Tina worked to make accommodations for her symptoms and kept living life as usual. After a vacation in Mexico, she became very ill with food poisoning. Physician-prescribed antibiotics made Tina develop c. difficile, an infection caused by the overuse of antibiotics. Tina’s weight plunged from 135 pounds to 85 pounds over a six-month period in 2008.

Her experience with the disease was compounded by socio-cultural influences. Being of South Asian descent, Tina says “I felt like a failure,” because many community members view gastrointestinal disorders as a disease fueled by poor personal diet choices. “My culture and many families are oftentimes against medications to treat IBD,” Tina explains. “By the time I tried biologics (whatever was available at that time to treat the Crohn’s), it was too late.”

In 2008, Tina underwent life-saving surgery to remove her colon, but her health issues were far from over. But that was a challenge in and of itself. Her family and elders within the community were against ostomy surgery. Tina  felt looked at as an outcast but went ahead with the ostomy surgery.

Six months post-surgery, Tina was navigating life with a stoma (a surgically created opening in the abdomen that connects to the digestive system to allow urine of feces to be diverted out of the body) and was slowly recovering. Due to the stigma around ostomies in her culture, at 25, Tina underwent a procedure to create a j-shaped pouch from her small intestine, that would enable her to defecate similar to how she did pre-surgery, and the stoma was reversed. She quickly developed pouchitis, inflammation of the j-pouch, which escalated into symptoms of bloody diarrhea. Tina combatted the symptoms for a few years with antibiotics, but the pouch began to burrow holes into other organs (abscesses developed and fistulae broke through). At this time, her diagnosis was changed from ulcerative colitis to Crohn’s disease.

It turned out that Tina had developed multiple fistulae that further impacted her quality of life.  After living with the j-pouch for 6 years, it had to be removed. Tina, this time, received a permanent ostomy. The wound from the j-pouch was not healing correctly, and a second medical opinion and MRI confirmed that pieces of the j-pouch and rectum were still inside Tina’s body, causing a pelvic fistula that could potentially impact her spine, causing paralysis.

“It was a really hellish period,” Tina recalls. “I had seven surgeries over eight months to correct the botched surgery that resulted in a chronic rectal wound and caused the large abscess and fistula. At the end of this whole process, another fistula had developed and I had had it. I decided to go into a clinical trial for (another) biologic.”

The results were encouraging.

“It took a good six months, but the fistula closed, and I was declared to be in remission,” said Tina.

Tina has had multiple complications from the many surgeries she has endured. “It’s complicated – it’s not cut and dry,” says Tina. “I have multiple diagnoses of other diseases that I continue to manage, but Crohn’s has really been the beast in my journey.”

There were several factors that motivated Tina to investigate clinical research as a health care option.

“I was like ‘Just get me on something!’ I am sick and tired of this disease and the surgeries and I needed to do something to make it stop,” says Tina. The physicians and staff of the clinical trial explained the details thoroughly. “I did a lot of thinking and research, and I decided I couldn’t keep living my life in and out of the hospital. Initially, my family was hesitant but they too were sick of seeing me suffer. My husband was on board with my decision.”

Tina’s experience underscored the importance of an accurate initial diagnosis and proactive disease monitoring and treatment. Between that and her experiences with cultural stigma and shame, Tina decided to shift her focus to patient advocacy.

“I learned a lot on my own through the research I did. I had become pretty savvy at reading technical science journal articles. I learned a lot from the doctors I met when we were discussing how to treat my disease,” said Tina.

Tina’s journey as a patient with Crohn’s disease has impacted her personal and professional life in profound ways.

“This has become a coming-of-age story – I realized I didn’t have to be ashamed of having this disease. I wasn’t disrespecting my elders because I was treating this disease. This is my body and this is my life and I have to pay that respect to myself as well. I don’t want anyone else to suffer, and that’s why I talk about clinical research and educate others on its importance.”

Tina started her advocacy work by launching a website, OwnYourCrohn’s.com, in 2018. Tina is now a well-known and respected voice in the Crohn’s community, regularly speaking at medical conferences and acclaimed academic research hospitals, as well as being widely quoted in the media. Tina is currently pursuing her Masters in Public Health at Mount Sinai. Tina also recently co-founded a community called IBDesis in conjunction with 5 fellow South Asians  who don’t want stigma and fear of medications to overshadow diagnosis and treatment of IBD.

When asked if she recommends clinical research participation to others, Tina says “Hands down, no question about it. I particularly want people of color, who may be skeptical of clinical trials, to know that every iteration is robustly managed in a clinical trial. You know you’re going to get the best care possible. It was honestly a no-brainer for me and I’d do it again in a heartbeat.”

To search for medical conditions in a specific location visit our Search Clinical Trials page.

To stay informed about clinical trials, visit our Resources page.

Sources

  1. https://www.bladderandbowel.org/bowel/stoma/what-is-a-stoma/

      2. https://ownyourcrohns.com/honoredhero/

Postpartum Depression (PPD) & Clinical Trials Part 1

Part 1 of a 2-part series. Medical professionals and patient advocates discuss their experiences with postpartum depression, one of the most common medical complications during and after pregnancy.

About the Panelists

kedwards_ws

Moderator
Kim Edwards,
Senior Manager, Health Communication Services, CISCRP

Dr. Constance Guille

Panelist
Dr. Constance Guille,
Founder & Director,
Women’s Reproductive Behavioral Health Program, MUSC,
Assoc. Professor,
MUSC

Dr. Jason James

Panelist
Dr. Jason James,
OB/GYN

Heather Dopp

Panelist
Heather Dopp,
Mom Ambassador,
2020 Mom

Speak Smart About Clinical Trials

If you join a clinical trial, you may want to share the news. But words are powerful, and can impact the study. This interactive infographic shares information and videos about clinical research and how to best communicate about it. Access it here.

Pediatric Perceptions & Insights on Clinical Trial Participation

In this November 2020 podcast, the results of a survey of 500 parents and children in the United States, conducted by CISCRP and commissioned by Parexel, are discussed. Key findings include determinants, motivations, barriers  to clinical trial participation and issues surrounding diversity in clinical research. Annick de Bruin, Senior Director, Research Services, CISCRP, moderates.

Access the podcast here.

CISCRP’s Patient Diversity Media Campaign Cited in ISMPP Article

PDMC-broadsheet-English-Spanish
The campaign is in English and Spanish.

CISCRP’s educational Patient Diversity Media Campaign was recently cited in an article in The MAP Newsletter, titled “Equity, Diversity, and Inclusion: Defining a Roadmap for Our Profession”.

Authored by Catherine Skobe, MPH, Pfizer, Angela Sykes, MA, MPhil, Pfizer, and Chris Winchester, DPhil, Oxford PharmaGenesis, the article discusses the importance of improving the outcomes for diverse populations in healthcare, building trust with patient and caregiver audiences, communicating scientific research clearly and making information accessible to all. Pfizer and Oxford Phamagenesis were among a number of companies that recently supported CISCRP’s Patient Diversity Media Campaign.

The MAP is a publication of ISMPP (International Society for Medical Publication Professionals).

CISCRP’s Journey to Better Health Project Honored with Citeline Awards “Medidata Clinical Parntership of the Year”

Award is Shared with Janssen, MedEvoke and Peer Plus

CISCRP is excited to share the Citeline Awards Medidata Clinical Partnership of the Year Award with Janssen, MedEvoke and Peer Plus for the Journey to Better Health, a mobile healthcare exhibit about clinical research that travelled to diverse communities across the United States. This innovative educational and recreational vehicle, equipped with interactive tools, healthcare information and relevant resources and data was staffed by knowledgeable experts and multi-lingual, CISCRP clinical research Ambassadors.

A variety of stations housed in the exhibit focused on:

  • Study volunteers and their experiences
  • Resources and take-aways for individuals interested in clinical research participation
  • Questions about eligibility criteria and the informed consent process in order for individuals to make informed decisions about clinical research participation
  • Potential risks and benefits

Stops included public schools, museums, libraries, community and senior centers, places of worship and free public health expos in Atlanta, Charlotte, Chicago, New York City, Newark and Long Island.

To view a video about the Journey to Better Health exhibit, click here. For additional educational resources about clinical research participation, visit CISCRP’s Education Center.